The Salesforce1 sforce.one.createRecord problem

Posted by on July 21, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

Recently I was working on a Salesforce1 mobile page and I ran in to an issue when attempting to use the sforce.one.createRecord API call. The code I started with was (condensed for brevity):

The idea here was to show the create record screen so that users could create a new Account when they clicked a button. 

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This worked fine on a desktop, but the createRecord call was a bit slow over cellular networks (on the order of 5 – 6 seconds to load sometimes). During this loading time, it looked like the page wasn’t doing anything so the users would click the button that fired this code multiple times, resulting in multiple new forms being shown. To prevent that, we added a loading layover that shows the first time the button is clicked, preventing the user from clicking it again. 

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So far this all worked fine, until we started really testing the create form. One of the things a user can do on the create form is click a cancel button which takes them to the previous form, where we got a nasty surprise: the loading screen is still there!

After some investigating, I found that the new Account form isn’t actually a new page, but is instead a layover on the current page, and the cancel button is just hiding the layover. Therefore, the custom page the user came from never gets reloaded.

We tried the onload event (which is only called when the page is loaded, not when cancel is clicked) and the onfocus event (which is only called if the user taps the screen again after clicking cancel). Neither were sufficient for us.

At this point, I opened a support case with Salesforce where they confirmed this is by design, and there is not a fix forthcoming.

We decided to take advantage of the fact that this is a layover and put in a timeout for the loading screen so the user isn’t permanently trapped. We added an idea to the Salesforce idea boards that you can upvote here if you think this is important to fix like we do.

EventWhoRelation – A gotcha

Posted by on July 16, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

I recently had a requirement on one of my projects to build a Visualforce page that summarized an event, including all of the attendees of the event. After doing some digging through the documentation, I found the EventRelation and EventWhoRelation standard objects provided by Salesforce. Reading through them, it sounded like the EventWhoRelation object best suited my needs, so I wrote the appropriate controller code to retrieve the attendees as follows:

This all worked fine, and when I tested the code through the UI I got back the results I was expecting. After I was satisfied with how it worked, I turned my attention to the unit tests to finish up. I started with the following code:

When I ran the unit tests, I saw the following logs:

Looking at the last line, there’s no Event Who Relations! Double checking the unit tests, I wasn’t running it as a particular user so I shouldn’t be getting any profile-related issues, and Shared Activities was enabled (otherwise EventWhoRelation wouldn’t be available at all), and I was using the latest API version available to the organization (31 as of this writing). The documentation says that EventWhoRelation is a filtered view of EventRelation, so I would expect that a record meeting the criteria listed (IsParent = true, IsWhat = false) to show up in the EventWhoRelation table.

I opened a support case with Salesforce to see what was going on here. After doing some digging on their end, they confirmed that the EventWhoRelation records are not created in test cases unless you add the @isTest(SeeAllData=true) attribute. Their explanation: since the EventWhoRelation is a derived table, we need to be able to see all data in the org to read from it (otherwise it’s just always empty).

We don’t typically condone using the SeeAllData setting unless absolutely necessary as it makes the tests more brittle and harder to maintain. The workaround I came up with is to not use the EventWhoRelation and instead use the EventRelation in my controller:

XRM Tooling – New Login Control

Posted by on July 14, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

With the latest CRM 2013 SDK, Microsoft has provided a new XRM Tooling library to connect to CRM.  Along with the new Tooling library comes a brand new Login control that is styled with the 2013 look and feel and can be used for custom WPF apps. 

In our new video below, I demonstrate how to easily setup the new Login control so you can be on your way with your custom CRM WPF app.

Prerequisites:

 

The Seven Use Cases Your Mobile CRM Sales Application Must Nail

Posted by on July 9, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

We’re now at the point where enterprise mobility should be built into your CRM platform from the beginning of a project. You know that your sales team needs to be able to access their accounts and data on the go.

But how can you guarantee your users will have what they need when they need it? Build an app that nails these seven use cases to ensure that your sales team can and will use your mobile CRM application.

#1. Availability
Don’t assume you are always connected to a network. The terrain that your sales team can cover varies and your app needs to be available every step of the way, regardless of possible nearby wifi networks or cellular connection signal strength. If your app doesn’t have the ability to record notes and orders offline and then immediately sync up when a connection is established, your sales team won’t use it in fear of losing valuable data.

#2. Brand Standards
When your sales team is meeting with prospects and customers they should be able to use their CRM app as a sales tool and collaborate directly with them. This includes being able to display specific product information, conduct a product demo and access relevant marketing collateral on the fly. Because your clients viewing your app with your sales team, your mobile CRM app needs to absolutely reflect your organization’s look and feel and reinforce brand standards.

#3. Digital Sales
Your team needs to be able to do more than pull up existing accounts in the field, they need to be able to create new ones! Your app must allow users to display and present sales collateral during client meetings. Most importantly you need to be able to pull up pertinent information relevant to a specific sale to get a holistic view of the account. Being able to check if merchandise is in stock or an updated version of an item is available could positively (or negatively!) impact the direction of a meeting.

#4. Location-Based Activity
Sonoma-phone-tabletAs your team travels throughout the day they need to be able to see the accounts and prospects in the area. Incorporating geo-coding into your mobile CRM app can help your team maximize their time in the field. If a meeting is cancelled or postponed, being able to identify prospects geographically could translate to a new opportunity.

#5. Activity Management
Not only should your team be able to monitor clients and sales opportunities but they need to be able to manage their schedules. Build a mobile CRM app that allows users to track and manage their day including appointments, tasks, and to-do lists. Make this process as touch friendly and as simple as possible. Creating a tool that provides value and simplicity back to the sales team increases the likelihood of user adoption.

#6. Account Management
It’s important that your users are actually able to manage opportunities in the field.
Accessing sales materials and product information is essential to making the sale but taking notes, updating contact information, and adding reminders for future meetings can be just as important. Building a mobile app that allows your sales team to manage an account at all stages while in the sales process guarantees that the highest quality of data will make it into your CRM.

#7. Build an App that Minimizes Training
If you deploy an app that isn’t intuitive or user-friendly, we guarantee that your adoption rate will suffer. Remember that having to use your CRM isn’t enough of a motivation for your users, they have to need or want to use it. Engaging in a user discovery process and investing in thoughtful user experience increases the likelihood that your mobile CRM app will satisfy the needs and wants of your users.

 

 

How to: Setting up Unified Service Desk

Posted by on July 8, 2014  |  commentsComments (2)

Earlier this year, we posted an overview of Unified Service Desk based on a Convergence session.  Now that the Spring ‘14 update has been released, get can get our hands on USD ourselves.

Note: This walkthrough is only meant for a development environment and should not be used for production.

First, head here to download the USD package.  This contains a CRM2013-USD-PackageDeployer.exe and a UnifiedServiceDesk.msi.  Run the msi which will install the actual USD desktop client onto your machine. 

Next step is to run the CRM2013-USD-PackageDeployer.exe which will extract files to a specified folder.  Navigate to the extracted folder and it should contain a PackageDeployer.exe.  This is the new Package Deployer tool that we blogged about last week but it will already contain packages specific to USD.  This tool will deploy solutions and import data to your organization so it is highly recommended to be done in a development environment.         

Run the PackageDeployer.exe and you’ll come to a login screen.  Enter credentials for the organization that you would like to install USD to and click Login. 

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Next you will get a list of package options to use.  Select the package you would like to use and click next.

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Clicking Next will move onto the next page that displays a detailed description of the package you are about to import into your organization.

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Click Next to verify the organization you are installing to and then Next again and the tool will validate the solutions and import files that it is about to install.

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Clicking Next again will start the import process and display a report of the status.  If there are any errors, you can click the link at the bottom left to view the log file.

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Clicking Next will display the completion page.  Then click finish and you’re done with the installation process!

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Now you can open the Unified Service Desk client that you installed in the first step.  A login screen very similar to the Package Deployer tool will display.  Enter your credentials to the organization that you installed USD to.

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Now you can play around with USD in your organization and get a feel for what is possible.  If you are interested in extending USD, head to MSDN where there is a great set of walkthroughs on adding custom modules, layouts, iframes, etc.

CRM Online Service Update 3 Rollout

Posted by on July 3, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

CRM Online Service Update 3 is being rolled out this week.  To find out if your organization has been updated, click the gear in the top right corner and click About to check the build number.  The build number for this update is 6.1.0.1043.

This update resolves a handful of issues both performance and usability related.  Here are some of the most notable fixes:

  • Duplicate records created if Save and Save and Close is pressed multiple times
  • Unhandled exceptions in asynchronous plugin instantiation causes Async service to crash
  • Option set not selected on first click
  • SQL deadlock and performance issues after Spring Release ‘14 update was applied
  • Multiple navigation and command bars show up via associated grid navigation

It is nice to see a steady release of fixes from Microsoft.  Especially with a focus of frustrating usability issues and performance optimization.  For a full list of fixes, check the KB article which can be found here.

Salesforce1 Mobile – Object-Specific Actions

Posted by on July 2, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

In part 1 (Branding your mobile application) of this series we talked about how to brand the Salesforce1 mobile application to fit your company’s standards. In part 2 (Becoming mobile ready) we met Bob the sailorman salesman and customized the Salesforce organization to make it more mobile friendly. And in part 3 (Global Publisher Actions) we took a look at one of the ways you can add custom functionality to your Salesforce1 mobile deployment – by implementing Global Publisher Actions. In this 4th and final part of the series, we will take a look at one more way to add custom functionality to your Salesforce1 mobile deployment – Object-Specific Actions.

Object-Specific vs Global publisher actions

The main difference between Object-Specific and Global publisher actions is that Object-Specific publisher actions are context aware. They are invoked from a specific record using the publisher icon in the lower right corner of the SF1 mobile app (as opposed to the left hand navigation) and the code to make them work knows which record the user was on when they started the action.

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This gives Object-Specific actions the ability to act upon the data contained in the record to perform various actions such as mapping the current Account using a maps application.

Bob’s Business

Bob is pretty happy with his mobile experience and has been adding Accounts to his VIP list which we built in the last part of this series, but the business is not as pleased. They’ve noticed that Bob has begun adding all of his Accounts to the VIP list, and would like to change the business requirements to have Bob also enter in a justification when he adds an Account to the VIP list. To enable this, we will build an Object-Specific publisher action for Accounts that Bob can use to promote them to his VIP list and enter the justification the business needs.

To do this, we will:

  1. Remove the VIP checkbox from the form
  2. Create a new custom field called ‘VIP Justification’ that will store Bob’s input. This will just be a long text field for now.
  3. Create and configure the Object-Specific action so that Bob can invoke it from an Account record.
    1. The action will take Bob to a new page which has the justification input field.
    2. When the page is submitted, the field is saved and the record’s VIP checkbox will be checked.

Step 1 – The customizations

At this point, these customizations should be old hat so I’ll just briefly go through what I did.

I created the new VIP Justification field on the Account object:

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I created a workflow that sets the VIP checkbox to true whenever the Account is updated to have text in the VIP Justification text area:

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And I updated the form to remove the VIP checkbox from it:

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Step 2 – The Justification Page

Next, we need to create the page that will allow Bob to input his justification. Because we just need to display the text box for Bob to be able to input the text, we will use one of Salesforce’s native action types to display a form. We could, however, also write and deploy a custom Visualforce page like we did in the previous post to have more control over the look, feel and exact mechanics of the page.

For now, navigate to Setup > Customize > Accounts > Buttons, Link, and Actions and click New Action:

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On the following page, enter in the following values:

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The Update a Record type is what will allow us to create a form to present to Bob so that he can enter in his justification. Once he clicks save, the workflow we set up earlier will automatically check the VIP box – no code required!

Once you click Save, the next screen will be the form we want to present to Bob. Edit it so that it only contains the following fields:

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Notice how we have to keep the Name field because it’s a required field. For our purposes, this is fine, but if we really didn’t want to display it we could write a custom Visualforce page that would track it in the background and only display the justification text box.

Before we save this, we need to make the Justification field required (no point in going to this page if you’re not going to enter anything…). To do this, hover over the VIP Justification field on the form so that the wrench icon appears, then click it. Next, click the Required checkbox and OK.

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Once that is done, click Save.

Step 3 – Giving Bob access to the action.

The last thing we need to do is give Bob access to use the new action we just built. To do this, we need to edit his layout (the Standard User Layout) and add the action to it.

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On the resulting page, click Actions in the header and drag the new Action we just created to the Publisher Actions section on the form. Click Save.

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Step 4 – Testing it out

Now that we’ve given Bob access to the action, he should be able to start using it! Looking at Bob’s mobile device, we can see:

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It’s our new action! If Bob clicks on it:

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Bob is presented with the justification page we built. He can enter in a justification and click ‘Submit’ to add the Account to his VIP list.

Wrap Up

This concludes our series on Salesforce1 Mobile. If you enjoyed it or found it useful, please let us know in the comments below!

Do you need help with your Salesforce deployment? Thinking about going mobile but aren’t sure what the best way to start is? Contact us! Our team of Salesforce and mobile professionals can help you from planning through deployment and post go-live support.

CRM 2013 Spring ‘14 Package Deployer Tool

Posted by on July 1, 2014  |  commentsComments (5)

The Package Deployer is a new tool that was released with the CRM Spring ‘14 update and provides administrators with an easier way to deploy to CRM organizations.  The Package Deployer can deploy one or more CRM solution files as well as import data and can even be extended to execute custom code to handle any edge cases while deploying to your CRM org.

Sounds great, so how do we get started?  Well first, you will need to have Visual Studio (2012 or 2013) installed, which we be used to create a package.  Next, download the latest SDK that was released with the Spring ‘14 update which can be found here.  After the SDK is installed, browse to SDK\Templates folder and run the CRMSDKTemplates.vsix to install the necessary Visual Studio Templates.

Now that we have everything setup, we can start to build our deploy package.

  • Open Visual Studio
  • Go to File –> New –> Project
  • Select CRM SDK Templates on the left
  • Select CRM Package Deployment Template and click OK

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This will create a structure in the Solution Explorer like shown below:

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The PkgFolder is where you put any CRM Solution files that you would like to be deployed as well as any import data files. 

In my example I have a solution “MySolution1” and “MySolution2” as well as a contacts.csv data import file.

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Now you can open the ImportConfig.xml and update it with your package files.  At the top of the config file you can also set if you want to install the out-of-the-box sample data as well as if you want to wait for the sample data to install before deploying your package.  There are two agent desktop settings as well that can be used when deploying Unified Service Desk.

In my example I have the package deploying sample data as well as waiting for it to finish before deploying the package.

<configdatastorage xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
                   installsampledata="true"
                   waitforsampledatatoinstall="true"
                   agentdesktopzipfile=""
                   agentdesktopexename=""
                   crmmigdataimportfile="">

In the solutions node you can define each of your solutions that should be deployed.

<solutions>
    <configsolutionfile solutionpackagefilename="MySolution1.zip" />
    <configsolutionfile solutionpackagefilename="MySolution2.zip" />
</solutions>
 
 

Lastly, you can define any data import files to be imported with the deploy.

<filestoimport>
    <configimportfile filename="contacts.csv" filetype="CSV" associatedmap="" importtoentity="contact" 
                      datadelimiter="" fielddelimiter="comma" enableduplicatedetection="true" isfirstrowheader="true"  
                      isrecordownerateam="false" owneruser="" waitforimporttocomplete="true"/>
</filestoimport>

That’s it for the ImportConfig.xml.  Here is my full config for reference.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<configdatastorage xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
                   installsampledata="true"
                   waitforsampledatatoinstall="true"
                   agentdesktopzipfile=""
                       agentdesktopexename=""
                   crmmigdataimportfile="">
  <solutions>
    <configsolutionfile solutionpackagefilename="MySolution1.zip" />
    <configsolutionfile solutionpackagefilename="MySolution2.zip" />
  </solutions>
  <filestoimport>
    <configimportfile filename="contacts.csv" filetype="CSV" associatedmap="" importtoentity="contact" 
                      datadelimiter="" fielddelimiter="comma" enableduplicatedetection="true" isfirstrowheader="true"  
                      isrecordownerateam="false" owneruser="" waitforimporttocomplete="true"/>
  </filestoimport>
</configdatastorage>

 

One last thing to note is that the PkgFolder contains a Content folder with a WelcomeHtml and EndHtml folder.  Within each of those folders are a Default.htm page.  These pages can be customized to your needs to provide a unique welcome and end page during the deploy process.

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Now you can build the solution in Visual Studio (Build –> Build Solution) which will create a dll that we will use for the Package Deployer Tool.  Go to the bin\Debug folder, copy the PkgFolder as well as the dll named the same as your Visual Studio project and paste them into SDK\Tools\PackageDeployer.

Run the PackageDeployer.exe and a login screen will appear.

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Select your organization and login.  The next screen will display an iframe showing the content from the WelcomeHtml folder.  As mentioned before, you can customize and brand the html page to suit your needs.

Click Next and you’ll see a screen that lists out the solutions and any files you have included to import.

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Click Next again and the Package Deployer will attempt to import the included solutions and files.  Once it is finished, it will give you a status on what succeeded or failed.  You will also see another screen showing the content from the EndHtml folder which can be branded and customized as well just like the Welcome screen.

As you can see, the Package Deployer tool is a great asset for administrators and customizers.  It is now easy to make your own branded installation wizard that covers most aspects of the deploy process so you can handle it in one fell swoop. 

When it comes to CRM software platform selection: Features are (almost) worthless

Posted by on June 23, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

One mistake we see our customers make over and over again is comparing, and ultimately selecting, a CRM platform based on a list of features.

DartsOften advertised as “new and improved”, CRM system feature lists include items such as: ease of integration, remote access, mobile access, integrated analytics, multi-channel support, and campaign management. If you’ve ever run a search for ‘CRM Features Checklist’ you could compile a list of dozens of “must-have” capabilities your CRM should include.

When it comes to selecting CRM software, basing the decision off of a list like this can be disastrous as features are updated at a rapid pace, and become outdated quickly.

Just how quickly are features updated?

Once an organization commits to a specific CRM platform, they typically will stick with that platform for AT LEAST 3 to 4 years before considering any type of switch. Every year, Salesforce.com pushes 3 major updates and Microsoft Dynamics offers multiple new releases as well. Let’s assume each new update includes several hundred new features. Doing some simple math:

- 4 year CRM platform lifespan

- 3 new releases per year

- 500 new features per release

- 6,000 NEW FEATURES!!

When you consider the CRM system you’re evaluating will have 6,000 new features over its lifespan, doesn’t it seem insane to perform a feature-by-feature comparison? The results of the shootout could be drastically different in just 3 or 6 months based on the product roadmap. Consequently, we think it’s futile (and potentially dangerous), to compare two CRM platforms on features as they exist today.

Here’s a not-so-little secret. At their core, ALL CRM platforms inherently share the essential features you need to get the results you want:

  • Giving your sales and marketing teams the ability to target your best customers? Check.

  • Optimizing information shared across departments? Check.

  • Accessing analytics to segment, analyze, and run reports on your business? Check.

  • Offering better customer service to build customer loyalty? Check.

So if we don’t recommend selecting your CRM platform based on today’s system features, you might be wondering “well then how should I select my CRM platform?” Glad you asked, we tackled this topic in a free eBook named the “The Ten Most Important CRM Evaluation Criteria”. You can learn more about the eBook and download it here.

The good news? As long as you pick one of the market leaders like Salesforce.com or Microsoft Dynamics CRM...either platform is flexible enough to be customized to meet your individual needs, regardless of how complex or unique you might think your business is. The real trick? Building a CRM platform that your sales team will use.

 

Best Time of Year to Purchase CRM software

Posted by on June 17, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)



Determining if it’s time for your organization to invest in CRM software can be a challenge. However once you’ve come to the conclusion that yes, you need CRM software for your business, do you know the best time of the year to buy? Knowing the fiscal calendar information for both Salesforce.com and Microsoft Dynamics CRM might help you save a few bucks! Just like buying a car at the end of the month, quarter-end and year-end time periods mean that CRM salespeople are aggressively trying to close as many deals as possible to hit their own goals.

If you case you didn’t already know, Salesforce.com’s fiscal year starts on February 1st, and Microsoft’s fiscal year starts on July 1st.

End of the Quarter
Clock-and-Calendar-1024If you’re ready to sign a contract but the end of the fiscal quarter is within arm’s reach, practice patience. As CRM vendors scramble to close out quarterly goals, recognize and take advantage of the opportunity you have to get a better deal on licensing and contract fees.

  • Salesforce.com quarter-end dates: April 30, July 31, October 31
  • Microsoft quarter-end dates: September 30, December 31, March 31

End of the Year
Similar to the end of the quarter mentality, waiting to sign your CRM software contract at the end of the year could land you in the sweet spot for cost. Year end is the absolute BEST time to negotiate yourself a great deal on your CRM software licenses.

  • Salesforce.com year-end date: January 31
  • Microsoft year-end date: June 30

Take Advantage of Offered Discounts
If you are working with a sales rep at Salesforce or Microsoft, please make sure to take advantage of the discounts they offer you when they offer them. We’ve seen situations where potential customers sit on a discount thinking they can get the same deal later. Unfortunately the quarter-end and year-end deals really do expire and some customers lose their discounts because they took too much time to make a decision. If you are ready to purchase, try to recognize a good deal when it’s handed to you!

When you’re planning your project, remember that the average project timeline with a CRM vendor takes 3-4 months from discovery to deployment. If you have an end date for when you would like your CRM to be up and running count backwards. Do your best to align your kick-off date with calendar to get the best rate for your CRM software and implementation.

A Day in the Life of the Mobile Sales User

Posted by on June 5, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

Enterprise mobility is your sales teams’ lifeblood.

Being connected even when lacking a connection, is essential for productivity and getting the job done. The best way to ensure that your team has the tools they need at their disposal is to build them a CRM app with enterprise mobility.

To demonstrate how important mobility is, we’ve outlined a typical day in the life of a sales person on the move and mobile dependent. I want you to meet Phil.

PhilPhil has 6 years of in-the-field sales experience working with a global manufacturing company. Let’s walk through a day in the life of Phil to grasp how essential CRM mobility is for him to successfully complete his day-to-day tasks. 

It really begins the night before.

These days, the day begins at midnight. 95% of people (and I’m going to guess that a majority of  your team doesn’t fall into the other 5%) bring their gadgets to bed; tapping, swiping, and browsing the web before they begin their slumber. It’s likely that the last thing they see before they go to bed is the glowing screen in their palm. It should be effortless to transition between their CRM and the apps they need to plan their day.

In Phil’s case, he starts preparing for the next morning’s meetings the night before. He confirms appointment times in his CRM and quickly takes a look at his weather app to see if he needs to plan for a longer commute.

Good morning, Phil.

A few hours later, the alarm goes off and the screen is glowing again. Phil takes another quick pass at his emails that have arrived overnight and checks his favorite websites, both professional and personal. He opens his CRM system and confirms his meetings for the day. It looks like he has 3 appointments and everything is set to run as planned. He rolls out of bed and starts prepping for his first meeting over breakfast.

The first meeting includes a new product demo with a potential customer. He checks the client’s profile in the CRM and notes that this account is hot- they are so close to closing the deal! Phil does a run-through of the demo to make sure everything is running smoothly and that he has the notes on the new features that came out last week. He also runs a report on the product’s inventory to make sure that the model the prospect is looking at is in stock.

Phil sees the afternoon is booked with current customers. He pulls up their existing profiles and orders and checks to see if any of their product lines have been updated. He also sees that it’s one of his client’s birthdays so he makes a mental note to ask about their plans to celebrate the big day. 

The mid-day check-in.

The morning meeting went better than expected. The prospect was blown away by the product demo and they gave Phil a verbal approval for a purchase order! Phil makes notes directly into the CRM during the meeting. He takes notes about the questions they have in order to update his FAQ page. The entire sales team is responsible for recording customer’s concerns, questions, and insights after their meetings. Because his CRM includes a field for client’s notes he can easily tap in the responses without disturbing the natural flow of the meeting.

Because the customer wants to get products in stock right away, Phil is able to place the order from the conference table. He confirms which items are in stock and which ones have a longer turn-around time. The ordering process moved quickly because of the smart fields built into the order form. Phil simply keys in the company’s name and the rest of the contact, billing, and shipping information fills automatically. Another benefit of using the CRM to prepare and manage an appointment.

Phil heads to the second appointment of the day.

He knows that he is meeting his contact at a lab in a basement and service is non-existent. Because his CRM saves all information he enters offline and syncs it back up when he reconnects he doesn’t need to switch to pen and paper to take notes.

The customer gives Phil her opinion on a new product she tested and he takes notes in real-time. Before using a mobile app, he was required to take these notes on paper and then had to rewrite them in the CRM on his desktop. Phil admits that the quality of his data before he got his hands on the mobile app were sub-par and the relationship with his clients sometimes suffered because of it.

Being unprepared for a sales meeting is unacceptable. With the current technology landscape, clients expect to be able to see the product you’re trying to sell as you’re trying to sell it. Because Phil has all of the tools in the palm of his hands, he is never concerned about being underprepared for a meeting.

The late afternoon.

Phil’s third appointment had to cancel because of a conflict. He checks tomorrow’s schedule before reaching out and notices he has an appointment with another prospect 3 miles away. He sends a follow up email, requesting to meet the following afternoon and the client obliges.

Because of geo-coding capabilities built into the CRM, Phil can organize his schedule based on locations. With the afternoon wide open, he decides to stop by another client’s office and drop off some free product samples. Because Phil can easily access his records via his mobile CRM application, he doesn’t waste any time adjusting his schedule and completing a task off his to-do list.

Sound familiar?

Enterprise mobility is your sales teams’ lifeblood. Are you 100% sure that your CRM system supports your sales team's needs? If not, please contact us. We can help you get them the mobile tools they need!

 

Salesforce1 Mobile – Global Publisher Actions

Posted by on June 4, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

In part 1 (Branding your mobile application) of this series we talked about how to brand the Salesforce1 mobile application to fit your company’s standards, and in part 2 (Becoming mobile ready) we met Bob the sailorman salesman and customized the Salesforce organization to make it more mobile friendly. Today, we’re going to look at how to extend the organization beyond what comes out of the box by looking at the primary way you introduce new functionality to your mobile users: publisher actions.

Publisher Actions – Extending your reach

Publisher actions are ways of adding additional actions that your users can take to the Salesforce1 mobile (and full) application. They can be context sensitive (called object-specific) that work with specific records, such as an action that logs a call related to the current Account, or they can be context insensitive (called global) that do not deal with any record in particular, such as an overview page or global map. Both types of actions have their places and are useful in different circumstances and we’ll cover both in turn. Today, we’ll focus on global publisher actions, how they work, and how to create a new action of your very own.

The Return of Bob

Bob has been using the customizations we made for him for a few weeks now and is happy with the changes. However, he has now started thinking about a new way to prioritize some of his customers. Bob would like to be able to track his Accounts that are very important to him and to be able to access them from quickly on his mobile device. To do this, we’re going to build a VIP list page for Bob and push the update to his mobile device so he can start using it right away.

For the time being, the checkbox to make an Account a VIP will be on the Account form itself.

Here’s the basics of how we’re going to approach this:

  1. We will add a custom field to Accounts called VIP that is a checkbox. If the checkbox is checked, then the Account is a VIP and should show up on the page that we will build.
  2. We will build a custom page that retrieves all VIP Accounts owned by the current user and displays them in a list. Clicking on a record will take you to the details of that record.
  3. We will expose this page in such a way that Bob can quickly access it the mobile application.

Step 1 – Add Custom Fields

This part should be pretty straightforward, so I won’t spend a lot of time going over it. We’ll add the checkbox to the Account object, add the field to the forms and update a few records to have the VIP status set.

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Step 2 – The VIP Page

Now that we have the fields in place, and some data set up, we can create the custom page that Bob will use to access his VIP list. The resulting page will look something like:

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To create this page, a developer will need to write some simple Visualforce and Apex code and upload it to the organization. The code will consist of two parts: the Apex controller which controls what data will be displayed, and the Visualforce page which controls how the data is displayed. I won’t go over the code line by line, but if you’re interested you can see the source code in this Github repository.

Step 3 – Exposing it to the mobile application

Once the code has been uploaded to the organization, we need to give Bob’s profile access to use the new code. We do this by navigating to the Standard User profile (Bob’s profile) and adding access to the appropriate pages:

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Next, we need to tell Salesforce that this Visualforce page is ready to be used in the Salesforce1 mobile application. We can do this by going to Setup > Develop > Pages > Edit 

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On the following page, check the box to enable Available for Salesforce mobile apps:

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Now that our Visualforce page is Salesforce1 mobile ready, we need to create a global publisher action that will use it. To do that, we go to Setup > Create > Global Actions

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After clicking New Action, we select the Action Type to be a Custom Visualforce page, Select our VIP List Visualforce page, and give it a label (the Height isn’t really needed since we’re using a Visualforce page). 

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Click Save.

Next, we need to edit the global publisher layout to include the new publisher action we created. In our case, we’ll create a new layout from the native one, edit it, and assign it to Bob’s profile. This will leave all other users’ global layouts intact, while giving Bob the functionality he needs. To do this, we go to Setup > Customize > Chatter > Publisher Layouts

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On the next page, click New and select the Global Layout to copy from:

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I chose to name this new layout Standard User Global Layout. Click Save. The resulting page shows you what actions have been included by default:

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Bob doesn’t actually need all of these actions, so we’ll modify his global layout to only include the actions he needs, including the new one we just built:

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Click Save.

Finally, we need to assign the layout we just created to Bob’s profile. Click Publisher Layout Assignment and edit the assignments so that Standard User uses the Standard User Global Layout:

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Click Save.

And that’s it. Bob should now be able to see and use the new action we just created for him. Back on Bob’s device, when Bob is on the feed (the default page when the mobile app starts up) and he clicks the publisher icon, he will see the new action available to him:

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If Bob clicks on one of the records, he’ll be taken to the record’s details page:

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The great thing about building actions like this is that we’re not constrained to putting them on the feed page. By editing the forms, we can also add the action to the various record forms, or we can create a Visualforce tab and use the Visualforce page we built to expose this page to the users through the left-hand navigation on the mobile device. All without changing any code in the page itself!

Take-away

Obviously the page we built today is very simple and just a demonstration of what can be done. The pages can become as complex as needed to fit your use case, and can be embedded in multiple locations to provide convenient access to the functionality as needed.

Are you looking to expand your Salesforce mobile functionality, and need help getting started? Don’t have developers to write the code? Have questions about mobility in general? Contact us and we can help.

Running Multiple CRM Apps: Good Crazy or Bad Crazy?

Posted by on June 2, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

Today's guest blogger is Jacob Cynamon-Murphy, a Sales Engineer at Sonoma Partners.

Let’s say you found yourself in a situation where you have two different CRM platforms running within your company. One group is using Salesforce.com and an entirely different group runs Microsoft Dynamics CRM. How did you get here? Maybe you had a renegade in the sales office or you're handling the result of a recent merger. Regardless of how you got here, what do you do now?

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Good news - you have choices. Whether you choose to consolidate to one system, create an integration bridge between the two, or "live and let live" with two disparate systems, we can help you make the best of a tenuous situation. From a high level, we see primarily three different options on how to handle these multiple CRM system scenarios:

  • Consolidation

  • Integration

  • Segregation

Where do you start? We believe that consolidation is the best approach if there is substantial overlap between:

  • the data in the two systems

  • the majority of functionality is duplicated between the two systems

  • the users of the two systems collaborate very closely or frequently

Integration makes sense if the two systems represent distinct phases of a business process, and there is limited overlap between the records in the two systems, but each system shares key data (such as accounts or contacts).

Example: You use Salesforce.com for lead acquisition and qualification and Dynamics CRM for opportunity management or product/service delivery. In this case, you may not need each member of your organization to be licensed in both systems and could instead create differentiated roles. This solution will keep licensing costs and maintenance efforts down.

Lastly, segregation might be the right option for you. If there is little to no overlap of users or data, there may be no impetus to have the systems talk to one another or, even more drastic, consolidated into a single platform.

One example of this is when one system is used for a completely custom capability, like learning management or HR, while the other system is used for the more conventional CRM scenarios of marketing, sales, and service. Although you end up with two different systems to support and maintain, you don't have to navigate the paths of integration or consolidation.

Now that you understand the basics of each of the three approaches, we want to share some additional thoughts for managing each path.

Consolidation

Let’s assume that you've decided that consolidation is the best approach to address your multiple CRM systems – this means consolidating multiple CRM systems into a single system, and the prior systems cease to exist.

At Sonoma Partners, we find most client choose this approach. Let's talk about what you need to keep in mind when electing consolidation.

#1: Merging Data - Odds are that you have a lot of overlapping or conflicting data, so your first step will be to complete a thorough analysis of your data. You need to identify duplicate records and the best approach to de-duplicate. Often that approach is a merge, but you may have reason to default to the records in one system or the other as "better data."

In any case, it is often best to extract your data from the CRM systems and use staging tables to store the data as you merge, manipulate, and cleanse your records. Without diving into detail, you should know that there are a handful of third-party tools you can use to avoid having to manage this manually.

#2: Reducing User Licenses - One potential benefit of consolidating CRM systems is that you might be able to reduce the number of CRM user licenses you need to pay for! However, when going through a consolidation, identify if the subordinate (i.e. "going away") system has a license expiration date that is prior to the cutover date. You want to avoid falling out of licensing compliance. Since most CRM contracts have annual or multi-year commitments, don’t expect any CRM vendor to offer short-term contracts so you need to plan accordingly.

#3: Integrating with Other Systems - Each of your CRM systems may already be integrated with other line-of-business applications. It is best to review each system and determine where other critical systems are integrated. Before you decommission the subordinate system, you'll want to reproduce any critical integrations into the new master CRM (i.e. "sticking around").

#4: Decommissioning Legacy Apps or Integrations - As part of this process, it's beneficial to review all of the legacy enhancements, add-ons, extensions, and integrations with both the subordinate CRM and the master CRM. Especially if two different groups were developing these solutions in a vacuum, your business may have invested resources in building duplicate features or producing/purchasing an enhancement that the master CRM can do natively. Alternatively, it's possible that the subordinate system could do something natively that you will need to configure or purchase for the master CRM to address the need going forward.

As you can imagine, it's best to know where you are headed before you start down the path of consolidation. The tips above should help you find your way.

Integration

Now let’s assume you've selected integration as the best approach to address your multiple CRM systems. Taking this path means you’ve agreed to maintaining more than one CRM system.  In addition to managing the licenses, your CRM administrator(s) will also need to manage multiple platforms and user bases.  If you go this route, here is what you need to keep in mind.

MultiCRMblog-small#1: Choosing an Integration Tool - There are a variety of integration platforms that can talk to multiple CRM systems - Scribe, Informatica, SQL Server Integration Services (with the appropriate connector), and Dell Boomi, to name a few. If you already have a preferred integration tool, and it supports your CRM systems, you really don't need to make a decision. However, if you don't currently have an integration tool in use, take some time to evaluate the options. Some key decision-making criteria you can use are: price, platforms supported, deployment model (is the tool an on-premise installation or is it SaaS), and does your team have existing skills to support the platform or would training be necessary.

#2: Determining System of Record - Since you have made the decision to maintain more than one platform, you need to determine which system, if either, will serve as the system of record (i.e. master data). Occasionally, you will already have another system, ERP perhaps, that serves in this role; in that case, both other systems may be subordinate to that system of record. If you do not already have a de facto system of record, think about which system is used more frequently or is more likely to have higher quality data. It is even possible that you will choose one system to be the master for some data (e.g. companies and contacts) and the other system master for other records (sales data or customer care records, for instance).

#3: Mapping the Data - A DBA or data architect will be indispensable at this stage. When mapping the data, you need a thorough understanding of the data schemes in both systems, which records or record types are 1-to-1 between the systems, and which fields (data columns) correspond between the records. The map defined here will ultimately feed into the integration setup stage, below.

#4: Setting Up the Integration - This is where the rubber meets the road. The best advice I can give you here is to define the integration mappings in your selected integration platform and run them against test instances of both platforms. Salesforce.com and Dynamics CRM Online both offer sandbox and test instances you can leverage and Dynamics CRM 2013 (on-premise deployment) offers the ability to export the full SQL database for import into a DEV or TEST server; for other CRM platforms your mileage may vary.

Segregation

This scenario offers less opportunity for strategic planning or tactical decision-making as the integration and consolidation approaches probably will. Customers who want a global view of accounts might not like this situation at all. Likewise, running multiple CRM systems means IT needs to duplicate some effort to manage multiple vendors. This includes keeping the right skills on staff, managing multiple roadmaps, negotiating licenses, renewals,etc.

On the plus side, CRM system segregation does offer some benefits that might appeal to certain companies:

  • You can designate different system administrators for each system so you don’t have to worry about “too many cooks in the kitchen”.

  • Related to this, IT can probably be more responsive to the business needs since they only need to worry about their own system. They don’t need to discuss system changes or customizations with other departments or groups.

  • Administrators have more opportunity to really tweak each CRM system to meet the user’s individual needs. Changing forms for different users is easy enough, but having entirely different systems allows administrators to get more aggressive with other things such as field names, currency, languages, etc.

  • Very little to zero change management to worry about, users keep running their existing CRM systems as-is. No interruption to the business.

Having multiple CRM systems in your organization might work for some companies, but definitely not everyone.  

Another variation of segregation is to consolidate some parts of the data from both systems into a reporting system or data warehouse. This approach allows organizations to have true global reporting across multiple systems, but obviously it requires additional work to setup the reporting infrastructure.

In summary, organizations have lots of different options on how they want to handle the multiple CRM platform decision. The “right answer” for your organization, might not be the same answer for a different organization because you should consider many different factors before deciding whether to consolidate, integrate or segregate. Our hope is that this post will give you some food for thought and peace of mind as you work through this situation.  As always, feel free to contact us if you need additional advice – we’re happy to help.

 

 

Salesforce1 Mobile – Becoming mobile ready

Posted by on May 28, 2014  |  commentsComments (1)

In my last post on Salesforce1 Mobile I showed you how to brand your mobile deployment of Salesforce1 to better fit your brand’s standards including how to change the logo, colors, and publisher button to your own. Now that you have an application that your users can identify with, it’s time to start thinking about the functionality that will allow your users to be effective and efficient at their daily tasks.

Meet Bob, the sailorman salesman

Let’s meet Bob, a door to door salesman who makes his living selling sailing equipment to private boat owners and retail boat companies. Bob has recently purchased Salesforce to track his various accounts, and is on the road most of the time. To begin, let’s look at one of Bob’s accounts in Salesforce1 mobile, without making any customizations to the forms.

Sf1_1

Bob isn’t really happy with this layout. All Bob wants to see is the name of the account, the phone number, and its address (captured in the Shipping Address fields). On the related list page:

Sf1_2

Again, there is too much information. All Bob needs is Contacts and Opportunities.

Customizing the forms for the mobile user

Let’s see if we can’t make Bob a little more productive by removing the fields from the form that he doesn’t need. The idea here is that we’re going to create a new form that only contains the information Bob needs to see, and assign it to his profile (Standard User). The other users in the system who do not have the same profile as Bob will continue to see the native form and can continue to use the extra fields if desired.

To create the new form, we go to:

Setup > Customize > Accounts > Page Layouts

SF1_3

On the Account Page Layout page, we’re going to create a new layout - not copying an existing layout - and naming it Standard User Layout.

The new default form includes the required fields by default. Let’s add the fields and related lists Bob wanted to the form.

SF1_4

Clicking Save, we’re brought back to the Account Page Layout page. We need to take one more step before turning this over to Bob – we need to assign the layout to Bob’s profile so that the application will use this new layout instead of the native one when Bob looks at an account.

Click the Page Layout Assignment button and change the Standard User to the Standard User Layout.

SF1_5

Once we let Bob know that the changes are ready and he refreshes the account on his mobile device, he will see the changes:

SF1_6

SF1_7

This is all fine, but we can do better. If Bob clicks the publisher button in the lower right corner, he’s still presented with many options that aren’t relevant to him:

SF1_8

SF1_9

Let’s remove these extra actions to just the ones he needs: new contact, new opportunity and link.

Publisher Actions – Overriding the defaults

Going back to our form, we see the Publisher Actions panel, but it looks like there aren’t any actions! Where are the default actions coming from? 

SF1_10

Reading the text carefully, it’s telling us the layout is inheriting the default ones from the global publisher layout and that we can override it, which is exactly what we’re going to do. Clicking the link provided gives us an editable box where we can drag just the actions we care about.

SF1_11

And back on Bob’s device:

SF1_12

Review

As you can see, enabling users to be productive while in the field is not as simple as giving them mobile access to a desktop oriented site. You need to spend time thinking about, and usually working with, the end user and their day-to-day tasks to customize the experience to best fit their needs. Sometimes this can take many iterations, as the users explore their options. Listen to your users’ feedback, and take it seriously as it may help you improve their efficiency, and by extension the bottom line.

Do you need some help with your mobile strategy? Not sure if mobile is for you? Contact us and we can help – from discovery all the way to delivery and post go-live support.

Dupe Detection on Create/Update Returned to Dynamics CRM 2013…with a bug

Posted by on May 28, 2014  |  commentsComments (1)

One of the biggest features removed when Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2013 was released was Duplicate Detection firing on creates/updates.  While duplicate detection remained via scheduling system jobs, the popular feature of seeing the pop-up appear on creates/updates was removed.

Needless to say the CRM community was in uproar, prompting some users and partners to create their own solutions to backfill the gap that was left by removing this 2011 feature such as this utility by Jason Lattimer.

With the Spring 2014 release that’s started to trickle out to CRM Online orgs, Microsoft has taken this community feedback and put duplicate detection on creates/updates back in.

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However, be aware that while Microsoft has pleased many by making this functionality available once again, they didn’t quite get it right.  If you disable duplicate detection rules from running on creates/updates within the settings, the rules still fire and your users will still see the dialog when they create or update records that match a duplicate detection rule.

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The only way to disable duplicate detection from firing on creates / updates is to uncheck the “Enable duplicate detection” checkbox which in turn disables it across the board (on data imports, from MS Outlook, and via scheduled system jobs).  Even if you uncheck “Enable duplicate detection” and recheck it (while leaving the creates/updates unchecked), after republishing your rules, the dialog will still fire on create and update. 

Note:  If you uncheck “Enable duplicate detection” and recheck it, you’ll have to republish your rules as disabling it system wide unpublishes all rules.

Hopefully Microsoft will release a patch soon for this slight oversight so that users can take full advantage of the duplicate detection feature as they did pre-CRM 2013.

When it comes to custom mobile app development, UX matters. A lot.

Posted by on May 27, 2014  |  commentsComments (1)

Sonoma Partners’ executive Jim Steger wrote a post last fall on enterprise mobile applications and their best features. He told an all too true story about his 2-year old’s innate ability to pick up a cell phone and navigate an app like a pro. It’s tempting to say that kids today come out of the womb getting technology these days but the truth is that app developers (the good ones!) just get it.

When it comes to Salesforce.com and Microsoft CRM mobile app development, we like to think that our camp of developers “gets it”. We understand that the usability of an app is its most important feature. This is precisely why Sonoma Partners whole-heartedly invests in our mobile app development… instead of just tacking it on to a list of service offerings.

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What does this UX investment look like?

Mobile app development comes in a lot of shapes and sizes: a loft space with 50 developers, a guy that remembers “a little code” from his college HTML course, a crowd-sourced app built by amateurs in their spare time, or one well-trained but over-worked developer carrying the entire load.

At Sonoma Partners, we utilize dedicated UX architects on every mobile app development project. At the beginning of your engagement we refer to them as the Silent Observer. They spend a day or two watching your users’ every move (we promise it isn’t as creepy as it sounds) to understand how they truly use your CRM. It would be one thing to interview you and ask you your process but it’s a horse of a different color to watch you use the platform and pick up on the shortcuts you take along the way. The primary goal of our UX architects in this phase is to pick up on your sales staff’s idiosyncrasies to observe and identify where efficiencies can be gained.

What do we do with these observations?

UXblog-smallWe begin an iterative design process. After we synthesize our observations we create low-fidelity mock-ups. We present you with a list of our recommendations and ask you what you think. We want to know:         

  • Have we properly captured how your sales staff uses your CRM on a day-to-day basis?
  • Have we distilled the 4 to 5 things that your users needs to be able to do over and over again with ease?
  • Have we created a dashboard that is easy to use and aesthetically pleasing?

Once we’ve reached an agreement we create high-fidelity mock-ups. This is where your app comes to life with your company’s style guide including logos, colors, fonts and font treatments, and spacing. The mobile app that we create for your Salesforce.com CRM or Microsoft CRM platform looks like an extension of your brand.

What do you get?


Assuming we did our jobs right, you’ll get a mobile application intuitive enough to use without any training. Our goal is that you and your sales team should be able to use your mobile application without an instruction manual or lengthy training session. That’s why we invest in UX architects and frontend development. We believe that when it comes to mobile application development, the UX design really matters. A lot.

 

 

Controlling Access to Access Team Templates

Posted by on May 23, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

One of the great new features of CRM 2013 is Access Teams.  Access Teams provides a great alternative over Sharing as Sharing should always be used as an exception and not the rule.  Too much sharing will lead to a large PrincipalObjectAccess (POA), which can lead to poor CRM performance.  This blog goes into details on recommendations to keep the POA table as small as possible.

For one of our customers we had a perfect scenario to use Access Team Templates.  The scenario is users should only have access to read their own records.  However, if they’re assigned a to-do that’s grouped together as part of a larger deliverable, they need to be able to see all details of that larger deliverable.  Therefore, adding them to the Access Team of the parent record with Read access, and allowing native CRM customizations to cascade that access down to the child records, the user is now able to see all data in this one grouping of work that they normally wouldn’t with normal security roles.

 

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Access Teams are driven by the Access Team Templates (shown above, and available in Settings –> Administration –> Access Team Templates).

However, there’s something you should be aware of.  If the Access Team Template is ever deleted, all Access Teams that were created and use that template will be deleted from the system.  Therefore you need to provide tight security over who can create / update / delete Access Team Templates.

This is where the tricky part came in.  How do you drive permissions to Access Team Templates?  In native security roles there’s no “Access Team Template” or anything similar to that available in the list of entities or miscellaneous privileges.  So what drives this access?

Through painful trial and error, we identified the “not so obvious” Customizations entity (shown below) drives these permissions.  Therefore it’s recommended you remove Delete privileges to Customizations to prevent Access Team Templates from being deleted (for other obvious reasons as well).  Thankfully out of the box only the System Administrator and System Customizer roles have this privilege.

 

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Graduating CRM Beyond Pipeline Management eBook

Posted by on May 20, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

So you’ve got your CRM deployment up and running smoothly. Congrats to you! If you’re like most of our customers, you probably started your CRM system with the sales organization and focused on getting better sales forecasting and pipeline management capabilities. Assuming all is going well, you might be tempted to think you’re “done”. Unfortunately, we’re here to inform you that your work is really just starting. In order to achieve the often-described 360-degree view of the customer, you need to develop a roadmap to expand your CRM deployment beyond the sales department.

Fortunately for you, the CRM system you already own is capable of performing a LOT more workloads for your organization. We estimate that most prospects we talk with only leverage 10-15% of their CRM system’s potential! To help solve this problem, we put together an eBook titled “Graduating CRM Beyond Pipeline Management”.

The goal of this document is to get organizations to think bigger about the capabilities of what their CRM platform can offer. We hope that it sparks some great conversations and opens people’s eyes to what’s possible with their existing CRM system.

You're spending a lot of money on your CRM platform, make sure that your organization is making the most out of its capabilities!

Download your copy of our eBook “Graduating CRM Beyond Pipeline Management” right now!

Salesforce Streaming API and IE

Posted by on May 19, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

Today I received a support request from one of our clients with something a little more unusual: a page we had previously built for them wasn’t working for their IE users. This page was using the Streaming API to provide a more interactive interface and let the users know when data had changed in their organization.

Debugging

After I received the initial description of the issue, I started to dig in. Since the page was working in both Firefox and Chrome, it was pretty much guaranteed to be a JavaScript issue. I fired up the dev tools in IE, and noticed the following statement in our logs:

Error

The statusText property here is what clued me in. Since I wasn’t seeing the error as uncaught, I changed the settings to break on any exception. When I did that, I was able to see the errors occurring inside JQuery:

Objectdoesnsupport

Hovering over the value of ‘i' in the debugger, the value was ‘withCredentials’. So it looked like there were some cross domain fields trying to be set that IE wasn’t liking. This didn’t really make sense to me as JQuery typically handles these kind of cross browser issues for you.

I pulled in Corey O’Brien, and we crawled up the call stack to inside the jquery.cometd.js file which was causing the AJAX request to be kicked off:

Call

Here you can see the xhrFields: withCredentials being set. Then we looked at what version of CometD we were on: 2.6. Looking at CometD’s download site, the latest stable version (at the time of writing) is 2.9. I pulled the latest files down from CometD, uploaded them as static resources and refreshed the page. After the update, all was well again.

In Short

If you’re having problems with IE not working correctly with the Salesforce Streaming API, try updating to the latest version of CometD. 

Big changes coming to the next major release of Dynamics CRM

Posted by on May 15, 2014  |  commentsComments (0)

Yesterday Microsoft announced some big changes to the supported configurations for the next major release of CRM after the upcoming Service Pack 1 and Spring ‘14 release.  This time around Microsoft is being more aggressive than they have in the past when removing supported software. 

The biggest changes to support being the removal of the following CRM and SQL Server operating systems:

  • Windows Server 2008
  • Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Small Business Server (All versions)
  • SQL Server 2008
  • SQL Server 2008 R2

As well as the removal of the following browser versions:

  • Internet Explorer 8
  • Internet Explorer 9

Some other notable changes are the removal of read-optimized forms and the 2007 SDK SOAP Endpoint that has been deprecated for awhile now.

It’s good to see Microsoft being more aggressive with future releases as they can focus more on providing the best product for the latest technology.  We also welcome the early communication as it gives customers a chance to prepare for the new changes.

If you have any questions or concerns about this announcement, head to our Contact Us page or post a comment below.  We would love to hear your thoughts.

Official announcement - http://blogs.msdn.com/b/crm/archive/2014/05/14/important-information-about-supported-configurations-in-the-next-major-release-for-crm.aspx


Contact Us for a Quote, or Personalized Demonstrationof Salesforce.com or Microsoft Dynamics CRM for Your Business.

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